by BLANQI August 30, 2017 11 Comments

Today, we're introducing Katelyn Thompson of Sweet Pea Sleep Solutions, a Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant. She's passionate about helping other parents get the sleep they and their children need while being gentle and responsive and keeping the parent-child bond secure. She will be sharing periodically on the blog ways to encourage just that for you and your little one! We're kicking off with 5 foolproof ways to gain successful sleep... let's dig in!
1. Consistency.
This is the top non-negotiable of helping your baby learn to sleep! If you have the best bedtime routine, the perfect method picked out, your partner is totally on board and your little is ready for more independent sleep- but you do not have consistency- you are setting yourself for frustration and wasted time! Children are ultra-adaptable and will soon pick up and learn to love a new routine, but it only becomes a routine if you are consistent every single night and day for at least two weeks.  
2. Calming Sleep Environment.
Make your child's sleep space a haven of comfort and calm! First, do a safety check to make sure there are no hazards in their room. Secondly, use blackout shades or curtains so that street and car lights cannot come through the windows. Even a small amount of light can suppress melatonin production! Next, make use of a calming sound machine. If you don't have one, there are a ton of great apps you can use! Make sure jammies and sleep sacks are cozy and warm enough for the temperature in your house. If your child has become attached to a lovey, make sure it is in the crib. Finally, I love to use lavender essential oil in a diffuser in my child's room. Studies have shown that lavender promotes calm and sleep.  
3. Confidence.
Sleep coaching can be tough for the first few nights, so decide why this is important to you and your family, and what your goals are, and be confident in them!  Think about how much happier and healthier your whole family will be when you are all sleeping better and are not overtired. Read the research on how important sleep is for your child's physical and neurological development. Your baby will pick up on your emotional state, so feel confident and calm and remember you are giving your child a gift by guiding them toward more restful and independent sleep.  
4. Create a Solid Routine.
A good bedtime routine should be no more than 20-30 minutes long, and consistent every single night. I love to start our routine out with a bath, followed by the final feeding for the night (bottle or breast), jammies, and a song or prayers. Following this routine, lay your child in bed drowsy but awake.  
5. Cut out Sleep Props.
Nine out of 10 times, a child's sleep issues stem from the use of a prop to get them to sleep. This could be a pacifier, bottle, nursing, rocking, bouncing or any number of tricks we use to get our little ones to sleep! The trouble with props when a child is older is that they have never learned to fall asleep on their own, so when they wake through the night they are constantly needing us to provide their prop to get them back down. Eliminating the prop and allowing your child to fall asleep independently in their bed or crib is the cornerstone of better sleep for the whole family!

Check out Katelyn's  website for further sleep resources and more about her story.


 
BLANQI
BLANQI


11 Responses

Rebecca
Rebecca

July 30, 2020

Hello. I have a two week old. For first week, we were on a consistent routine – she'd wake up and we changed diaper, breastfed until she fell asleep and then we'd put her back down. Then I read that feed-to-sleep is discouraged. Plus, no opportunity for Timmy time or other interaction. We've been trying now to feed first, then change diaper, have some awake time, then go down. Only problem is that she fights going down, often demanding more breast (for a quick feed that lulls her to sleep). I try not to let her stay awake long, but by the time she's been fed and her diaper changed, it's already almost time to go down and she's usually not ready/sleepy. I'm not sure what to do to make this transition easier and I feel like I get conflicting advice anytime I search for answers. Please help. Also, I swaddle her when putting her down but not usually while feeding. This makes it hard to seamlessly respond to her if she wakes up and wants to be fed. Instead I have to take her out, feed, then wrap her up again and repeat over and over. Is that ok? Any advice is appreciated!

Sheri W.
Sheri W.

July 30, 2020

I have a 4 1/2 month old girl who has reflux and a milk protein allergy. I also was recently diagnosed with PP cardiomyopathy. So we have had to suddenly temporarily stop breastfeeding to let her gut rest. She sleeps better with the hypoallergenic formula. However, she naps about 30-45 min every 90 min during the day and only sleeps 3-4 hours tops at a time at night. I have to bounce her to sleep sitting on a stability ball. While that's been great for my weight loss (lol!), I'm exhausted. One pediatrician said she won't be developmentally ready until 6 months, another said she can sleep train now. There is so much confusing conflicting information out there!!! I don't know when to start but I'm afraid that her props (feed to sleep and the bouncing) are only going to have to continue or are going to be super hard to break. Any suggestions??? Please?!

Jessica
Jessica

July 30, 2020

Is this something that can be modified to work while co-sleeping?

Ramey
Ramey

July 30, 2020

Although I am not a cry it out advocate, my doctor did not recommend allowing my baby to cry it out before 4 months old. An 8 week old baby needs as much love and cuddles and help as you can give. Try to remember your baby is that, a baby.

Susee
Susee

July 30, 2020

Please never ever let your baby … infant 'cry out out'. There are 'gentle parenting' Facebook pages. Looking at the article I'd say this is for 18 months or over. Whilst consistency is important it's not always possible if baby poops and needs to be changed. I don't agree with not rocking or soothing baby to sleep actually. Do some research this is not a good article imo.

Gemanique
Gemanique

July 30, 2020

If my son falls asleep nursing that is a prop but then do I wake him up to put him in his crib. How do I stop him from falling asleep while nursing? What if he's not done eating? When I put him in the crib do I let him cry it out?? He's 8 weeks old.

Amber
Amber

July 30, 2020

My little one just turned 3 months and his sleep is worsening. At 4-8 weeks he would sleep for 1 long stretch at night of up to 6 hours. Since 9 weeks at least 5x/week he is up every 2-3 hours to nurse. The hardest part is he has severe reflux and the doctor told me to keep him upright/elevated for 30 minutes after he eats. So he ends up falling asleep during that time. What is gentle sleep training I can try for him?

Amanda
Amanda

July 30, 2020

Great tips! Excellent article. Thank you!

Hannah
Hannah

July 30, 2020

Thank you so much for this advice!! We are preparing for our first little one (to arrive in October), and I have been trying to soak in as much advice and info as I can!

Leigh
Leigh

July 30, 2020

Great tips! Now I just need to bite the bullet and implement some of them, especially the no props (pacifier)!

BLANQI Blog
BLANQI Blog

July 30, 2020

It's true! Easier said than done. Good luck!

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